Democratic republic congo dating

In 2016, the Democratic Republic of the Congo made a significant advancement in efforts to eliminate the worst forms of child labor.

The Government adopted a revision to the Labor Code that raised the minimum age of work to 18 and launched a Human Development Systems Strengthening Project that aims to increase access to birth registration and improve school infrastructure.

Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour la Stabilisation en République Démocratique du Congo (MONUSCO).

https://monusco.unmissions.org/sites/default/files/131024_monusco_cps_public_report_on_armed_group_recruitment_2012-2013

A high ratio indicates a high degree of current primary education completion. As a result, statistics on children’s work in general are reported in this chart, which may or may not include the worst forms of child labor.

Bureau International Catholique de l’Enfance, Bureau National Catholique de l’Enfance en RDC, Programme d’Encadrement des Enfants de la Rue, et Groupe des Hommes Voués au Développement Intercommunautaire. https://bice.org/app/uploads/2016/06/CRC74_Rapport Alternatif Conjoint_BICE_BNCE-RDC_PEDER_ MOI refers all cases to the MOJ for prosecution, and assists victims in seeking justice.(62, 65, 67-70) Monitor humanitarian programs and coordinate with UNICEF, USAID, and NGOs to provide social services to vulnerable groups, including street children, trafficking victims, and child soldiers.(27, 71, 72) Investigate and use military courts to prosecute military officials suspected of recruitment and use of child soldiers or forced labor of civilians. Lead the implementation of the Child Soldiers Action Plan.(27, 49) Through its Department of Child Protection (DISPE), coordinate actions with UNICEF.(66) * The Government does not publish this information. In addition, the process is slow, collaboration between partners is weak, and reintegrated child soldiers remain vulnerable to re-recruitment and stigmatization.(27, 31, 33, 36, 48, 85, 108) Outreach campaigns targeting girls resulted in an increase in girls separated from armed groups, but more attention still needs to be given to girls in the DDR process; girls make up an estimated 30 to 40 percent of children associated with armed groups, but only 8 percent have been demobilized.(32, 42, 48, 82, 108-110) Research was unable to determine whether activities were undertaken to implement the Program to Support Vulnerable Children or the Decent Work Country Program (2013–2016) during the reporting period.(66) Research also indicates the Government needs to strengthen its efforts to assist street children, integrate child labor issues into existing agricultural programs, and implement programs specifically designed to assist children engaged in mining, forced labor in domestic work, and commercial sexual exploitation.(29-31) Based on the reporting above, suggested actions are identified that would advance the elimination of child labor, including its worst forms, in the DRC (Table 11). Suggested Government Actions to Eliminate Child Labor, Including its Worst Forms Implement existing laws, including those that provide for free education and require demobilized children to be handed over to child protection actors for social services and reintegration assistance. Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour la Stabilisation en République Démocratique du Congo (MONUSCO) official. Cease the practice of beating children and/or detaining children with adults for engaging in the worst forms of child labor. Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. "The United Nations set an ambitious education goal. " Washington [online] June 8, 2016 [cited June 8, 2016]; https:// Children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in the mining of gold, tin ore (cassiterite), tantalum ore (coltan), and tungsten ore (wolframite), and are used in armed conflict, sometimes as a result of forcible recruitment or abduction by non-state armed groups.(1-5) Table 1 provides key indicators on children’s work and education in the DRC. Statistics on Children’s Work and Education Farming, including tilling fields, planting seeds, watering crops, carrying heavy loads,† weeding, harvesting crops, and use of chemical products and machetes in the production of coffee, peanuts, tea, quinine, eggplant, manioc, sweet potatoes, leafy greens, corn, beans, rice, cassava leaves, and other vegetables (3, 8-13) Mining,† including sifting, cleaning, washing, sorting, working underground,† transporting, carrying heavy loads,† use of mercury and explosives, and digging in the production of diamonds, copper, cobalt ore (heterogenite), gold, tin ore (cassiterite), tantalum ore (coltan), and tungsten ore (wolframite) (1-3, 8, 9, 15-23) Forced recruitment of children by non-state armed groups for use in armed conflict, including as bodyguards, messengers, porters, domestic workers, spies, check point monitors, looters, and concubines (4, 29, 35-39) (FRPI), Mayi Mayi groups, and other armed groups—continued to abduct and recruit children to be used in their units.(37-41) Some victims of child trafficking were recruited at refugee camps in neighboring countries and transported through DRC to participate in armed conflict.(27) Child labor in artisanal mining is prevalent in the provinces of Katanga, Eastern and Western Kasai, North and South Kivu, and Orientale, and the commercial sexual exploitation of girls and sometimes boys is prevalent around mining sites.(2, 4, 14) However, a comprehensive, standalone, child labor survey has never been conducted in the DRC.(13, 42) Although the Government has mandated free primary education, these laws were not implemented throughout the country and some families are required to pay for school uniforms, tuition, and additional fees, which may be prohibitive.(2, 8, 9, 13, 19, 21, 25, 40, 43-45) Many schools throughout the DRC are oversubscribed, understaffed, poorly maintained, or require students to travel long distances.(2, 8, 12, 45, 46) Schools in eastern DRC may be closed due to the conflict, or occupied by armed groups or internally displaced persons.(5, 8, 29, 37, 39-41, 47) There are also reports that children may be forcibly recruited or sexually abused on their way to school or subject to physical or sexual abuse at school.(27, 29, 40, 47) Children may sometimes join armed groups or engage in child labor in artisanal mines hoping to earn money, and internally displaced children often have difficulty accessing education.(2, 9, 15, 17, 19, 22, 46, 48) Low rates of birth registration leave many children vulnerable to child labor.(9, 40, 46, 49) The Government has established laws and regulations related to child labor, including its worst forms (Table 4). However, gaps exist in the DRC’s legal framework to adequately protect children from child labor. Laws and Regulations on Child Labor Articles 28-35 of Decree on Working Conditions for Women and Children; Articles 10-15 of the Decree Establishing the Conditions for Children’s Work; Articles 23 and 26 of the Mining Code; Article 8b of the Decree on Validation Procedures for Artisanal Mines; Article 125 of the Labor Code (52-56) Articles 2 and 3 of the Labor Code; Articles 53 and 187 of the Child Protection Code; Articles 16 and 61 of the Constitution; Article 8 of the Decree Establishing the Conditions for Children’s Work (44, 50, 51, 53) Article 3 of the Labor Code; Articles 53 and 162 of the Child Protection Code; Article 174j of the Penal Code; Article 8 of the Decree Establishing the Conditions for Children’s Work (50, 51, 53, 57) Article 3 of the Labor Code; Articles 53, 61, 169, 173, 179-180, 182, 183, and 187 of the Child Protection Code; Article 174 b, 174 j, 174 m, and 174 n of the Penal Code; Article 8 of the Decree Establishing the Conditions for Children’s Work (50, 51, 53, 57) * No conscription (3) ‡ Age calculated based on available information (43, 50, 60) In July 2016, the Government adopted revisions to the Labor Code that raise the minimum working age to 18, prohibit children from working at night in either public or private enterprises, and permit children ages 16 and 17 to engage in light work as determined by the Ministry of Labor. However, children in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continue to engage in the worst forms of child labor, including in the forced mining of gold, tin ore (cassiterite), tantalum ore (coltan), and tungsten ore (wolframite), and are used in armed conflict, sometimes as a result of forcible recruitment or abduction by non-state armed groups. A lack of trained personnel, resources, and poor coordination hampered the Government’s efforts to combat child labor, and laws mandating free primary education are not enforced.

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